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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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The example you gave or I gave?

Posted on: 2007/12/23 16:28
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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Quote:

Darren wrote:
The example you gave or I gave?


The example I gave.

Posted on: 2007/12/26 14:00
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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I found the word liverwurst today in "The Martian Chronicles". What a strange noun... like iceberg.

Posted on: 2008/1/2 17:45
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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"The Martian Chronicles" that starred Rock Hudson?... interesting...

Posted on: 2008/1/2 18:24
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Re: Question for the English people
Wonderlust
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I think Bene's reading the book, Darren, whereas I am watching the DVD

Posted on: 2008/1/2 20:19
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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I greatly enjoyed the televised Chronicles... if the book is the written version of that, that Bene is reading, and books are generally better (given they delve deeper), I'm sure it's a darn good read...

Posted on: 2008/1/2 21:10
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Re: Question for the English people
Wonderlust
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but the televised version is so haunting... it was truly inspirational to me when I watched it as a twelve year old... it captured the sheer mystery of space better than any other sci-fi series

Posted on: 2008/1/2 21:41
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Yes, it's quite unique... the only other movie I've seen that is close to it, is Bowie's The Man Who Fell To Earth.

Posted on: 2008/1/2 22:19
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Re: Question for the English people
Wonderlust
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I agree with you on that one! Bowie was made for that film

Posted on: 2008/1/2 22:26
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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What comes to your mind when you read this:
wishing well?

Posted on: 2008/1/16 11:38
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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And another one:

Would you accept this as (colloquial American) English:

There's somethings I've never been told.
There's somethings we've never shown.
?

These are two lines from a Candlebox song ("Crooked Halo").

Posted on: 2008/1/16 12:47
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
Bene wrote:
What comes to your mind when you read this:
wishing well?

Free...

Posted on: 2008/1/16 15:26
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
Bene wrote:
And another one:

Would you accept this as (colloquial American) English:

There's somethings I've never been told.
There's somethings we've never shown.
?

These are two lines from a Candlebox song ("Crooked Halo").


Both crap... the lyricist in Candlebox ought to go back to school...

"There's some things I've never been told"

"There's some things we've never shown"

Better still:

"There are some things I've never been told"

"There are some things we've never shown"

Posted on: 2008/1/16 15:28
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Re: Question for the English people
Wonderlust
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Quote:

Darren wrote:
Quote:
Bene wrote:
And another one:

Would you accept this as (colloquial American) English:

There's somethings I've never been told.
There's somethings we've never shown.
?

These are two lines from a Candlebox song ("Crooked Halo").


Both crap... the lyricist in Candlebox ought to go back to school...

"There's some things I've never been told"

"There's some things we've never shown"

Better still:

"There are some things I've never been told"

"There are some things we've never shown"


Darren's transliteration was what I was inwardly aching to read when I read those original lyrics. However, I think there's something rather joyous and free when people mess around with language; 'pollute' more correct grammar with the sloppiness of living speech, where the written word is clearly transcribed speech firstly, rather than a written conception / structure. Was it not James Joyce -to cite a 'worthy' example- who threw himself so completely towards the possibilities of this?

Posted on: 2008/1/16 23:53
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
rouss wrote:
Darren's transliteration was what I was inwardly aching to read when I read those original lyrics. However, I think there's something rather joyous and free when people mess around with language; 'pollute' more correct grammar with the sloppiness of living speech, where the written word is clearly transcribed speech firstly, rather than a written conception / structure. Was it not James Joyce -to cite a 'worthy' example- who threw himself so completely towards the possibilities of this?

Yes, BUT... or ALAS... or HOWEVER... people don't write HOW they speak, generally... in the same way that people don't generally LIVE exactly how they're portrayed to live in books/on the big screen...

If you're going to experiment with lacksadaisical forms of communication, one ought to have a rudimentary grasp of how things SHOULD/OUGHT to be done, rather than just assuming no one will mind...

Posted on: 2008/1/17 0:18
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Re: Question for the English people
Wonderlust
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I agree that it's the tension created when deliberately erring from an accepted structure that is the 'play' of language enjoyed by, as I say, Joyce and others. The expression of simple ignorance is less joy[ce ]ful.

P.S. -and you're gonna hate me for this- it's lackadaisical. Though I'm beginning to think you might be double-bluffing

Posted on: 2008/1/17 0:29
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Naaah... still recovering from nights, after a long block of shifts over the weekend...

Posted on: 2008/1/17 0:40
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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Quote:

Darren wrote:
Quote:
Bene wrote:
What comes to your mind when you read this:
wishing well?

Free...


Hmm, could you elaborate on this...?

Because I have to possible readings in mind, but I'm not sure if I'm not only deriving one from German. The strange thing is, both readings would fit with your comment.

Posted on: 2008/1/17 12:10
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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Quote:

Darren wrote:
Quote:
Bene wrote:
And another one:

Would you accept this as (colloquial American) English:

There's somethings I've never been told.
There's somethings we've never shown.
?

These are two lines from a Candlebox song ("Crooked Halo").


Both crap... the lyricist in Candlebox ought to go back to school...

"There's some things I've never been told"

"There's some things we've never shown"

Better still:

"There are some things I've never been told"

"There are some things we've never shown"


Well, I'm not so sure if Kevin Martin - who wrote these lyrics - is to blame. I got these lyrics from the net, and I had the suspicion that the one who put them there was just writing them down by listening and with not so much care (I just thought that this was so obvious a mistake an English speaker wouldn't have made it, so I thought if it is so obvious wrong - it can only be true).
I have to control the booklet which was not at hand that moment; the lyrics are printed there, but in Kevin Martin's handwriting, which is not always easy to decipher.

Posted on: 2008/1/17 12:15
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
Bene wrote:
Well, I'm not so sure if Kevin Martin - who wrote these lyrics - is to blame. I got these lyrics from the net, and I had the suspicion that the one who put them there was just writing them down by listening and with not so much care (I just thought that this was so obvious a mistake an English speaker wouldn't have made it, so I thought if it is so obvious wrong - it can only be true).
I have to control the booklet which was not at hand that moment; the lyrics are printed there, but in Kevin Martin's handwriting, which is not always easy to decipher.

Lyric writers can get away with all sorts...

Writing them is one thing... listening to/transcribing is another... I've transcribed what I've heard before from audio sources... accuracy is something one needs to aspire to in terms of who the readership might be... otherwise the "Chinese Whisper" syndrome comes into effect and the resultant water-down becomes a norm...

Posted on: 2008/1/17 13:13
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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I looked it up in the booklet and even Kevin Martin's hand-writing might be sometimes hard to decipher it is obvious that the guy from the net is not to blame: the lines are the same. There's no gap between some and things, as it is in the following two lines (where the gap is clearly recognizable in the hand-writing):

There's somethings I've never been told.
There's somethings we've never shown.
There's some lines I've never told you.
There's some times I, I've never showed you.


Well, obviously this is a case of "freedom of the artist".

Posted on: 2008/1/18 12:29
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Ah yes... that good old word and condition that everyone likes to aspire to... "freedom"... unfortunately, most people forget... with having "freedom" comes responsibility and obligation... i.e. what you do with it, once you have it...

Posted on: 2008/1/18 13:19
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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But one's probably free to do with language whatever one likes. It belongs to no one. There just the risk of being understand by no one anymore.

Posted on: 2008/1/21 17:22
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Re: Question for the English people
The Jasmine Flower
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Ahh... I have a question of the English people as well.

Why is the word "quickie" written "quickie" and not "quicky" (as it would make more sense, in my opinion)?

Posted on: 2008/1/21 17:32
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
Bene wrote:
But one's probably free to do with language whatever one likes. It belongs to no one. There just the risk of being understand by no one anymore.

Haha... there is that...

Posted on: 2008/1/21 22:35
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
Bernd wrote:
Ahh... I have a question of the English people as well.

Why is the word "quickie" written "quickie" and not "quicky" (as it would make more sense, in my opinion)?

I don't know the actual reason but I would venture this opinion... "ie" is more jokey, funny, or humorous than "y"

...plus also, "quicky" could quite easily be mistaken for "quickly" which would give it a completely different meaning...

Posted on: 2008/1/21 22:37
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Re: Question for the English people
The Jasmine Flower
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There was the singer Blondie, she called herself Blondie, but not Blondy.

Posted on: 2008/1/22 0:12
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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Quote:

Bernd wrote:
There was the singer Blondie, she called herself Blondie, but not Blondy.


Maybe is a tribute to a certain dog...

Posted on: 2008/1/22 11:38
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Re: Question for the English people
The Jasmine Flower
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Posted on: 2008/1/22 12:25
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Re: Question for the English people
Storm
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How would you call this symbol:

.

"Period" or "full stop"?

Posted on: 2008/2/25 13:50
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Re: Question for the English people
Wonderlust
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Quote:

Bene wrote:
How would you call this symbol:

.

"Period" or "full stop"?


I would say 'full stop'. My impression is that 'period' is an Americanism.

Posted on: 2008/2/25 14:23
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
Bernd wrote:
There was the singer Blondie, she called herself Blondie, but not Blondy.

Correction... there was, and is, a BAND called Blondie, who is fronted by a female singer, called Debbie Harry.

Posted on: 2008/2/25 14:50
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
rouss wrote:
Quote:
Bene wrote:
How would you call this symbol:

.

"Period" or "full stop"?

I would say 'full stop'. My impression is that 'period' is an Americanism.

Yep.

Also, the word "period" that describes the fullstop is sometimes used, as a catchall end phrase when summing something up...

Posted on: 2008/2/25 14:51
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Re: Question for the English people
The Jasmine Flower
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When there is a "full stop", are there any "half stops" or "empty stops" as well?

Posted on: 2008/2/25 14:52
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Re: Question for the English people
The Jasmine Flower
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Quote:

Darren wrote:
Quote:
Bernd wrote:
There was the singer Blondie, she called herself Blondie, but not Blondy.

Correction... there was, and is, a BAND called Blondie, who is fronted by a female singer, called Debbie Harry.

Oh, you are right. Thanks.

Yeah, "Debbie" for Deborah, but not "Debby".
Debbie, Maggie, but Mary, Sandy...

Posted on: 2008/2/25 14:57
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Re: Question for the English people
Redbird
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Quote:
Bernd wrote:
Yeah, "Debbie" for Deborah, but not "Debby".
Debbie, Maggie, but Mary, Sandy...

Marie and Sandie are also women's names...

Posted on: 2008/2/25 15:01
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Re: Question for the English people
Wonderlust
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A half stop is perhaps a colon : and a quarter stop a semi-colon ;
Some people these days use a comma , instead of a semi-colon, whose exact usage remains controversial.
I like the ellipsis... which is something of a 'catch-all' (I use it too often, and rather lazily) for 'there's more to be said on the matter but, moving on... etc. etc.
You'll also note that my use of 'etc.' is, in fact, tautologous with the '...' However, I don't believe in mathematical precision in writing. I tried it once upon a time and the text ended up barely readable. Plus, I gather Derrida put paid to the possibility of ultimate precision in writing, along the lines of 'multiple readings of a sentence tend towards the contradictory ergo, the available interpretations of a sentence cancel one another out'. Not something I'd care to prove, but ask anyone to define a word 'exactly' and you'll get a slightly different answer from most people who aren't consulting the same dictionary simultaneously.

See, if I'd instead left it after : with an ... I'd have saved myself some effort

Posted on: 2008/2/25 19:30
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Re: Question for the English people
The Jasmine Flower
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Why do American people say "someone is married with three children", meaning this person is married to his wife and they have three children together? I mean, this person hasn't married his own three children, he has married his wife.

Posted on: 2008/3/10 20:38
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Re: Question for the English people
South
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It's like maried-comma-with children

Posted on: 2008/3/10 20:48
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Re: Question for the English people
Siren
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Quote:

Bernd wrote:
Why do American people say "someone is married with three children", meaning this person is married to his wife and they have three children together? I mean, this person hasn't married his own three children, he has married his wife.


sometimes they say "he has three children and an adult"

Posted on: 2008/3/10 22:45
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